Johan Johansen

Avdelingsleder/forskningssjef

(+47) 957 32 132
johan.johansen@nibio.no

Sted
Bodø

Besøksadresse
Torggården, Kudalsveien 6, NO-8027 Bodø

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The hypothesis of the present study was that increased growth in spring, stimulated by increasing temperature and daylength, leads to oxidative stress in Atlantic salmon with accumulation of oxidation products in the tissues and increased utilization of antioxidants. The drop in fillet pigmentation and astaxanthin, often observed in spring by the industry, could be explained by oxidative stress. Furthermore, oxidative stress may cause production related diseases such as development of cataracts and melanin spots in the fillet. We sampled Atlantic salmon from two cages in a commercial scale experiment in Northern Norway (67°N), every month from April until August and then every second month until December (510 ± 160–3060 ± 510 g, mean weight ± std). The specific growth rate (SGR) increased with increasing temperature until midsummer and decreased thereafter. We found that vitamin E in the fillet and vitamin C in the liver were depleted in the spring and were restored in the autumn, even though the dietary concentrations were stable. Astaxanthin concentration in the muscle was constant during the spring and summer and increased in the autumn, concomitant with an increase in astaxanthin supplementation. Cataract increased from zero in May until July, when 90% of the fish were affected. The glutathione based redox-potential in the lenses became more reduced from June, indicating a protective mechanism against oxidative stress and cataract. The number of fish with melanin spots was high in June and decreased in August and October, but the size and intensity of the remaining spots increased in the same period. The change in vitamin C and E concentrations, cataract and glutathione metabolism during spring and early summer, indicate that the fish became oxidized in this period, while malon-di-aldehyde (MDA) and astaxanthin concentrations did not support the hypothesis. There are too few data to draw conclusions on possible effects of oxidative stress on melanin spots.

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In Europe, turbot aquaculture has a high potential for sustainable production, but the low tolerance to fishmeal replacement in the diet represents a big issue. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of more sustainable feed formulations on growth and feed performance, as well as nutritional status of juvenile turbot in recirculating aquaculture systems. In a 16-week feeding trial with 20 g juvenile turbot, one control diet containing traditional fishmeal, fish oil and soy products and two experimental diets where 20% of the fishmeal was replaced either with processed animal proteins (PAP) or with terrestrial plant proteins (PLANT) were tested. Irrespective of diets, growth performance was similar between groups, whereas the feed performance was significantly reduced in fish of the PAP group compared to the control. Comparing growth, feed utilisation and biochemical parameters, the results indicate that the fish fed on PAP diet had the lowest performance. Fish fed the PLANT diet had similar feed utilisation compared to the control, whereas parameters of the nutritional status, such as condition factor, hepato-somatic index and glycogen content showed reduced levels after 16 weeks. These effects in biochemical parameters are within the physiological range and therefore not the cause of negative performance. Since growth was unaffected, the lower feed performance of fish that were fed the PAP formulation might be balanced by the cost efficient formulation in comparison to the commercial and the PLANT formulations. Present study highlights the suitability of alternative food formulation for farmed fish.

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recent publication by Belton et al. raises points for policy-makers and scientists to consider with respect to the future of aquaculture making recommendations on policies and investments in systems and areas of the world where aquaculture can contribute most. Belton et al. take an ‘us versus them’ approach separating aquaculture by economics, livelihood choices, and water salinity. They conclude “that marine finfish aquaculture in offshore environments will confront economic, biophysical, and technological limitations that hinder its growth and prevent it from contributing significantly to global food and nutrition security.” They argue that land-based freshwater aquaculture is a more favorable production strategy than ocean/marine aquaculture; they disagree with government and non-governmental organizations spatial planning efforts that add new aquaculture to existing ocean uses; they advocate for an open commons for wild fisheries as opposed to aquaculture; and they oppose ‘open ocean’ aquaculture and other types of industrial, capital-intensive, ‘carnivorous’ fish aquaculture. They discredit marine aquaculture rather than explain how all aquaculture sectors are significantly more efficient and sustainable for the future of food than nearly all land-based animal protein alternatives. As an interdisciplinary group of scientists who work in marine aquaculture, we disagree with both the biased analyses and the advocacy presented by Belton et al. Marine aquaculture is growing and is already making a significant contribution to economies and peoples worldwide. None of the concerns Belton et al. raise are new, but their stark statement that farming fish in the sea cannot ‘nourish the world’ misses the mark, and policy-makers would be wrong to follow their misinformed recommendations.

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Salmon processing commonly involves the skinning of fish, generating by-products that need to be handled. Such skin residues may represent valuable raw materials from a valorization perspective, mainly due to their collagen content. With this approach, we propose in the present work the extraction of gelatin from farmed salmon and further valorization of the remaining residue through hydrolysis. Use of different chemical treatments prior to thermal extraction of gelatin results in a consistent yield of around 5%, but considerable differences in rheological properties. As expected from a cold-water species, salmon gelatin produces rather weak gels, ranging from 0 to 98 g Bloom. Nevertheless, the best performing gelatins show considerable structural integrity, assessed by gel permeation chromatography with light scattering detection for the first time on salmon gelatin. Finally, proteolysis of skin residues with Alcalase for 4 h maximizes digestibility and antihypertensive activity of the resulting hydrolysates, accompanied by the sharpest reduction in molecular weight and higher content of essential amino acids. These results indicate the possibility of tuning salmon gelatin properties through changes in chemical treatment conditions, and completing the valorization cycle through production of bioactive and nutritious hydrolysates.

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EU aquaculture produces only a small fraction of the internal demand of aquatic foods, but boosting this activity must be done in compliance with high standards of environmental protection and social benefits, as fostered by the policies on circular economy recently launched by the EU. Nevertheless, the assessment of the environmental sustainability of aquaculture and other food production systems is complex, due to the different tools and approaches available. Moreover, the current EU regulatory framework may be restricting the options to implement some circular solutions. This paper examines the controversies related to the assessment of environmental impacts of aquaculture processes and the different available circular solutions, with a focus on the best options to valorize aquaculture side streams and how current regulatory burdens and gaps should be solved.